Carpal Tunnel Surgeries

Carpal tunnel syndrome is a condition that can affect the hand and wrist. It causes pain, numbness and tingling in your fingers and thumb. Carpal tunnel syndrome occurs when pressure builds up in the space between your palm bone and wrist bone through repetitive motions like typing or playing the guitar. The symptoms are typically worse at night because you’re less mobile during sleep time.

Nonsurgical treatments are sometimes effective at easing the pain and numbness of carpal tunnel syndrome.

Nonsurgical treatments are sometimes effective at easing the pain and numbness of carpal tunnel syndrome. If you have this condition, you may have noticed that your hand feels tingly, numb or weak when you use it. The symptoms can also be painful during activities such as typing on a keyboard or using tools like scissors and knives.

To help relieve these symptoms and prevent further nerve damage:

  • Avoid activities that cause or worsen your symptoms by avoiding repetitive tasks for long periods of time; this includes sitting at a desk all day long, if possible!
  • Stretch your wrist muscles regularly (see below). If possible, do so while wearing a wrist splint at night to keep your wrist from bending too far backward during sleep.

To find out more about the steps to take to get relief from such symptoms, contact our team at Saqsham Ortho today!

Surgery for carpal tunnel syndrome can involve cutting the ligament that presses on the nerve.

Surgery for carpal tunnel syndrome can involve cutting the ligament that presses on the nerve. This surgery is not a complete solution and may not be successful in all cases, but it’s still worth considering as an option if you have failed conservative treatments.

There are many risks associated with this type of surgery:

  • You could experience pain or numbness around your wrist after surgery.
  • Your hand might become swollen after surgery, which could make it hard to use tools or work with your hands.
  • You might need physical therapy after having this procedure done if you do not have strong enough muscles to regain full function right away.

If you are still not sure and need a detailed explanation of the surgery and the risks involved, feel free to book an appointment session with Saqsham Ortho to get all your questions answered!

Endoscopic and other types of surgeries

Endoscopic surgery also involves cutting the carpal ligament.

This procedure is minimally invasive, meaning that it requires fewer incisions and has a faster recovery time than open surgery. It can be used for a wide variety of conditions, including:

  • Back pain (muscle spasms)
  • Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS)
  • Obesity
  • Heart disease
  • Cancer
  • Infertility (men)

Another surgical approach involves making an incision in the palm, then cutting open and trimming the ligament that forms the top of the tunnel, allowing more room for the nerve and tendons.

  • Your wrist contains the carpal tunnel, which is where the radius and ulna, two bones that make up your hand, converge.
  • The ligament that creates the roof of the carpal tunnel is called the carpal ligament.
  • Before reaching its final destination at your elbow, the median nerve must pass through this area and across a bone outgrowth known as an osmetacarpal.
  • Because they are squeezed together by thicker or degenerative cartilage, these nerves may swell or become inflamed with arthritis or trauma (called “fibrocartilage”). If left untreated for a prolonged period of time, the numbness and pain from this pressure move up your wrist and into your arm.

During a carpal tunnel release, the surgeon makes an incision in your palm and cuts through the ligament to widen the carpal tunnel and relieve pressure on your median nerve. The cut is made between your index finger and thumb on the base of your palm near where it meets your wrist. This is called a palm-based or dorsal approach.

A study was conducted by Alberta Health Services, a provincial agency that provides health care in Alberta. It compared two approaches to surgery — a dorsal approach like that described above and an ulnar-side approach, which involves cutting through scar tissue on the side of your hand between your ring finger and little finger rather than in your palm. It found no difference between the two in terms of long-term results.

The researchers used criteria from previous studies to determine what is considered ideal for treating carpal tunnel syndrome: doctors should be able to release 80% or more of all nerve endings; patients with numbness should have full sensation returned within six weeks after surgery, and only 10% or less need additional treatment beyond simple physical therapy (such as massage).

To find out whether this type of surgery might work better than others for treating CTS patients who have had no success with other therapies such as corticosteroids or Botox injections—or both—they decided not only how they would measure results but also who would be included in their study. Only those whose symptoms were severe enough before coming into contact with medical professionals were eligible for inclusion; others who had milder symptoms were excluded from consideration altogether because those people could potentially benefit even more from treatment options other than the surgery itself.

If you have repeated episodes of carpal tunnel syndrome, you may want to reduce or change stressful activities or work conditions that may contribute to it. You can do this by altering motion or force, changing hand position or taking frequent breaks during repetitive tasks that require hand use. For further consultation and queries regarding the surgery for Carpel Tunnel Syndrome, connect with us at Saqsham Ortho now!

FAQ

How much time does the surgery take? What is the overall time taken for the patient to recover post-surgery?

The surgery takes less than an hour to perform under regional or general anaesthesia. Because there are no large muscles involved, recovery time is shorter than with other types of hand surgery; most patients are able to return to work within two weeks after their procedure has been completed.

What to do if you experience repeated episodes of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome?

If you have repeated episodes of carpal tunnel syndrome, you may want to reduce or change stressful activities or work conditions that may contribute to it. You can do this by altering motion or force, changing hand position or taking frequent breaks during repetitive tasks that require hand use.

You can also try wearing a wrist splint when you’re at home and sleeping, especially if you have a history of carpal tunnel syndrome. Wearing the splint will help reduce the stress on your wrist muscles while they’re resting and sleeping (this is why they say “rest” after surgery).

Is it true that for most patients suffering from Carpel Tunnel Syndrome, the reason is unknown?

It is true that for most patients suffering from Carpel Tunnel Syndrome, the reason for the illness is unknown. A patient suffering from a condition that puts pressure on the median nerve in his wrist can lead from this illness. Regardless, some of the common conditions include pregnancy, obesity, arthritis, etc.

At Saqsham, we care for your well-being and strive to bring you the best orthopaedic care and solutions. If you are experiencing any hand and wrist issues and would like to get a medical opinion,
we’d suggest you book an appointment.